The Willing Cook-A-Long: Pumpkin Scone and Challenge Revision

My high hopes for the Willing Cook-A-Long challenge haven’t turned out with all the fanfare like I had wished.  I still think trying a new dish every week is a great idea and I hope you will join in this challenge.  However, I’m going to change things up a little bit to see if it works better for all of you.  If not, we’ll see how else it might work better.

  1. I will post the new recipe that I’m going to try for the next week.  I will still come back the following week with my review and changes to the recipe.
  2. You can make the same recipe as me, or…
  3. You can make your own new dish and tell us about it.

Regardless of what you choose to do, you can come back here and link up to your post (if you have a blog) or just tell us what you made in the comments.  Hopefully, this will bring some new traffic to your site.  You can make an original dish or try someone else’s recipe.  Just let us know what exciting new dish you made.  I think this challenge might make things a little more flexible and “cook-friendly”.

Now onto the Pumpkin Scone challenge…

I made two batches of pumpkin scones and both were hugely successful!  I cannot recommend this wonderful fall treat with a hot cup ‘o joe enough.  They weren’t terribly difficult or time consuming to make either (of course, the gluten-free scone took a little more time grinding flour).  My kids and husband (and me too!) loved our Pumpkin Scones and I will definitely make them again.

Did you make the Pumpkin Scones this week? Leave a blog link or comment in the comment section.

Changes I made and the revised recipes…

Batch 1: I just made them dairy, egg and soy (by default) free.

Batch 2: I made this batch gluten, dairy, egg, soy, and corn free.  I learned something new…powdered sugar contains corn starch.  I had to switch up the icing to make it corn-free.  Kind of a bummer, but my husband didn’t mind.  UPDATE: You can make homemade, corn-free powdered sugar by grinding white sugar down to a powder.  I have updated the gluten-free recipe to reflect this.

(And, of course, I’m having camera issues again, so my very old point-&-shoot is what you get.  Oh well!  It’s the taste that counts, right?)

Free of Dairy, Egg, Soy, Peanut/Treenut

Whole Wheat Pumpkin Scones

Recipe adapted from www.sweetpeaskitchen.com

Ingredients

  • 2 cups whole-wheat flour
  • 1/3 cups brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon, ground
  • 1/2 teaspoons nutmeg, ground
  • 1/4 teaspoons cloves, ground
  • 1/4 teaspoons ginger, ground
  • 6 tablespoons Spectrum Organic All Natural Butter Flavor Shortening (dairy & soy free)
  • 1 EnerG egg replacer
  • 1/2 cups pumpkin, canned
  • 3 tablespoons allowed milk (cow, rice, soy, almond, coconut, etc.)

Instructions

Refrigerate Spectrum Butter Flavored Shortening until ready for use (30 minutes is good).

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or use baking stone.

In the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle attachment (you could also use a food processor), stir together the dry ingredients. Add the chilled shortening in by the tablespoon. Cover with flour mixture. Mix on medium-low speed until the texture resembles coarse cornmeal, with shortening pieces no larger than pea-size.

In a separate bowl, whisk together your egg replacer, pumpkin and allowed milk. Fold wet ingredients into dry and form into a dough ball. (You may need to use your hands to get it all fully incorporated. If too crumbly, add a tablespoon of milk.)

Pat out dough ball onto baking sheet until about 1 inch thick and form into a circle. Cut triangle slices with large knife, then cut triangles in half, making a concentric circle.

Bake for 14-16 minutes, or until light brown. Place on wire rack to cool.

While scones are cooling, make the powdered sugar glaze and spread on top.

Powdered Sugar Glaze:
1 cup powdered sugar
2 Tbsp allowed milk (almond, rice, soy, cow's)

While the first glaze is firming, make the spiced glaze. Then drizzle the spiced glaze on top.

Spiced Glaze:
1 cup + 3 Tbsp powdered sugar
2 Tbsp allowed milk
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp ground nutmeg
1 pinch ground ginger
1 pinch ground cloves

Allow icings to harden before serving (or just dig in!).

Printer-Friendly Version

Free of Gluten, Dairy, Egg, Soy, Corn, Peanut/Treenut

Pumpkin Scones, gluten-free

Recipe adapted from www.sweetpeakitchen.com

Ingredients

  • 1 cups millet flour
  • 1 cups tapioca flour
  • 1/3 cups brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoons arrowroot flour/powder
  • 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon, ground
  • 1/2 teaspoons nutmeg, ground
  • 1/4 teaspoons cloves, ground
  • 1/4 teaspoons ginger, ground
  • 6 tablespoons Spectrum Organic All Natural Butter Flavor Shortening (dairy & soy free)
  • 1 EnerG egg replacer
  • 1/2 cups pumpkin, canned
  • 3 tablespoons allowed milk (cow, rice, soy, almond, coconut, etc.)

Instructions

Refrigerate Spectrum Butter Flavored Shortening until ready for use (30 minutes is good).

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or use baking stone.

Grind gluten-free flours, if necessary. In the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle attachment (you could also use a food processor), stir together the dry ingredients. Add the chilled shortening in by the tablespoon. Cover with flour mixture. Mix on medium-low speed until the texture resembles coarse cornmeal, with shortening pieces no larger than pea-size.

In a separate bowl, whisk together your egg replacer, pumpkin and allowed milk. Fold wet ingredients into dry and form into a dough ball. (You may need to use your hands to get it all fully incorporated.)

Pat out dough ball onto baking sheet until about 1 inch thick and form into a circle. Refrigerate for 30 minutes, if not firm enough to form or cut. Cut triangle slices with large knife, then cut triangles in half, making a concentric circle.

Bake for 14-16 minutes, or until light brown. Place on wire rack to cool.

While scones are cooling, make the powdered sugar glaze and spread on top.

Powdered Sugar Glaze:
1 cup powdered sugar
2 Tbsp allowed milk (almond, rice, soy, cow's)

While the first glaze is firming, make the spiced glaze. Then drizzle the spiced glaze on top.

Spiced Glaze:
1 cup + 3 Tbsp powdered sugar
2 Tbsp allowed milk
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp ground nutmeg
1 pinch ground ginger
1 pinch ground cloves

Allow icings to harden before serving (or just dig in!).
Enjoy!

Printer-Friendly Version

Update: A reader commented that you can make homemade powdered sugar (with the corn starch) by grinding white sugar in a blender or coffee bean grinder.  I am going to try this very soon and will report back on how well it works! Thanks for the tip!

———————-

For the next Willing Cook-A-Long challenge, I will be making Yakisoba.  I will have to figure out what I want to do with the soy sauce, but it looks delicious.

What new dish will you try this week? Get creative! Expand your horizons!  I can’t wait to hear.

 

Recipe shared at Hearth and Soul Blog Hop, Tasty Tuesday, Gluten-Free Wednesdays, What’s on Your Plate, Sweet Tooth Friday, Allergy Friendly Friday, and Slightly Indulgent Tuesday.

Featured on Money Saving Mom.

This entry was posted in Allergy Cooking, Recipes, Willing Cook-A-Long. Bookmark the permalink.

41 Responses to The Willing Cook-A-Long: Pumpkin Scone and Challenge Revision

  1. I made the scones gluten-free, dairy-free, and soy-free, and blogged about it here – http://thericeoflife.wordpress.com/2011/10/14/willing-cook-a-long-pumpkin-scones/ I really enjoyed these. The rest of my family didn’t share my enthusiasm as much, but then my husband never cared for regular scones, and my daughter usually just eats frosting.

    • Cook says:

      Thanks for linking up! I didn’t find these to be too scone-y. Kind of cookie, brownie, cake-ish. (Don’t you love all my terminology:). )

      Hope to see you back next week!

  2. And just a thought. Perhaps make a widget on your sidebar so that it’s easy to find this week’s recipe challenge. Yakisoba – I’ve never had it. I’d like to make it, if I can find gluten-free soba noodles.

    • Cook says:

      Yes, I’ve been thinking the same thing. Perhaps I can make some headway on that this weekend. Thanks for the feedback!

      As far as the noodles go, I picked up some buckwheat noodles at an asian store a couple of weeks that I plan on using. Personally, I don’t pay too much attention to the specific noodle as long as it is of the asian sort and wheat free.

  3. Desi says:

    If i wanted to make these scones with real egg – do i just replace one egg for the egg replacer? These look YUMMY!

    • Cook says:

      You can go to the link on Pumpkin Scone to get the original recipe, but yes, it is 1 egg. Since you have no allergies, you can just make the original recipe. But if you want to swap out the flour for whole wheat flour, just do an even substitution, but don’t pack the flour in the measuring cup. Whole wheat flour is a little denser.

      There were so good! In fact, I was thinking of making some more this week.

      • Laura says:

        You may want to check your egg replacer. I don’t use it anymore because it contains corn. I use the Ener-G brand.

        • Cook says:

          That’s interesting. I just checked out my Ener-G egg replacer and there was no corn. But I will certainly keep an eye on it. Thank you for bringing it to my attention!

          • Laura says:

            It’s either in the cellulose or the citric acid, or both. I called the company to check. But my box isn’t new, so maybe they’ve changed the formulation.

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  5. Liberty says:

    Can’t wait to try these!
    Blessings
    Pumpkin breakfast bliss bars here – you’re next challenge?? http://bit.ly/ouXgr8

    • Cook says:

      Those look great, Liberty! I’ve never thought about using Quinoa flakes in such a way. I’ll have to give them a try soon.

      Thanks!

  6. Jennifer C. says:

    Yay! Found your recipe via Money Saving Mom. Gonna try these tomorrow! Did you know you can make your own powdered sugar – just blend sugar until fine in the blender or coffee grinder…it eliminates the corn starch!

    • Cook says:

      Oh, thank you so much for that tip. I make my own gluten-free flour in a coffee bean grinder, so it only makes sense to do sugar too. I wasn’t crazy about the brown sugar icing, although my wheat-free husband didn’t mind. Using homemade powdered sugar because of his corn-allergy opens a whole new world for us! I’d love to know how the pumpkin scones turn out for you. Thanks for stopping in!

      Michelle

      • michelle stewart says:

        Whole Foods sells 365 powdered sugar that is made from tapioca not corn. Its great and can even make frosting to decorate with.

        • Cook says:

          I figured there was a brand out there that didn’t contain corn and I plan to check around. When I was making the Pumpkin Scone recipe (without corn), I didn’t realize until the last minute that powdered sugar contains corn starch. I was forced to improvise.

          Thanks for the tip! I might make a trip to Whole Foods tomorrow.

  7. Julia A says:

    Thank you for the recipe! By the way baking powder usually contains corn starch, unless you make it yourself by mixing baking soda with cream of tartar.

    • Cook says:

      Thanks for stopping in and your comment! Yes, baking soda does have corn in it. I usually substitute arrowroot flour for baking powder (see recipe 2). I was just thinking the other day that I could do the baking soda/cream of tartar substitute also. I hope you enjoy the recipe!

  8. LaTanya says:

    Is there a substitution for the tapioca flour? Not only does my doctor have me gluten free, I have to avoid tapioca and sesame.

    • Cook says:

      Now that’s something I haven’t heard. Tapioca, that is. A good substitute would be potato flour/starch (easily found at an asian store). I find their textures to be very similar. Let me know if that works out for you.

  9. Heather Irvine says:

    Trader Joes (If you have one near you) also sells Corn-free powdered sugar for WAY cheaper than the whole foods brand. The only issue is that they only sell it during the holidays, so stock up!

    • Cook says:

      Thanks! I don’t recall seeing powdered sugar at TJ’s, so the holiday stock is probably the reason. I was just there a week ago, but didn’t see any. I’ll check the next time I go.

  10. diana mcadams says:

    The Hain brand of baking powder is called Featherlight…or Featherweight. Can’t remember which. Amazon carries it, if you can’t find it anywhere else. But it’ll be cheaper at a Whole Foods or somewhere like that.

  11. Great post! I LOVE making gluten free and vegan scones, check out my blog post on Brown Sugar Maple Glazed scones! These are egg, dairy, casein, soy, peanut, gluten, wheat, and (optional) corn free (without glaze) (phew!). I added you to my blogroll! Love what you are posting!

    http://veganbakerista.blogspot.com/2011/10/brown-sugar-maple-glazed-scones.html

    Love, Vegan Bakerista

  12. Pingback: Willing Cook-A-Long: Yakisoba « The Rice of Life

  13. C. Zam says:

    For egg substitutions, have you ever used a cabonated drink? Apparently, it is a weight watchers trick where the egg and oil is substituted for a can of soda/cabonated drink.

    • Cook says:

      Thanks for the tip! I haven’t tried that. We’re not big pop drinkers in our house (my husband has a corn allergy), so it’s not something that I normally have on hand. My EnerG egg replacer lasts a long time and is easy to whip up, so I typically just us it.

      • Kristi says:

        I am fairly new to the whole corn free thing….is the EnerG egg replacer corn free? I thought I read the ingredients at the store today and thought there was something that was corn derived.

        • Cook says:

          Kristi,

          Sorry it has taken so long for me to get back to you. I finally gave the ingredients of EnerG egg replacer a closer look. The leavening ingredients do appear on the corn ingredient list, so you definitely want to proceed with caution. Since my husband’s food allergies are not life-threatening, I don’t watch out for every particular ingredient, like those listed on EnerG. If your corn allergy is severe and you are also egg-free, you might want to go the flax seed/water egg substitute instead. I have not personally used it, but I see allergy cooks use it all the time. You can find the exact substitution under eggs on my substitutions tab. http://willingcook.com/substitutions/

          Let me know if you have any other questions.
          Michelle

  14. Emily says:

    I just made these for a bridal shower (gluten-free, although I used eggs and real butter – wheat is the only allergy in our family). They are so delicious! Oh my goodness! My husband didn’t want to let me leave with them! Thank you so much for taking the time to alter it from the original!

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  16. Kristi says:

    I am having trouble finding the millet flour, is there something I could substitute for that? I really want to try making these but am not an experienced gluten free baker. Thanks!

    • Cook says:

      Kristi,

      I think you could also use sorghum flour, although I’ve not used it. I buy whole millet from Whole Foods out of the bulk bins for $1.19/lb. and then grind it into flour in my coffee bean grinder. Do you have a Whole Foods? If not, you can also buy whole millet off Amazon and I think food co-op sites. A final option is to check at Asian grocers for sorghum flour or millet. Does that help any? I hope so!

      Michelle

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  18. Trish says:

    Given the many positive comments, I had high hopes for this recipe. I followed the directions–although I neglected to chill the dough–and used my cast iron scone pan, as I always do. The result was not up to my standards. The scones rose very little and stuck to the pan. Inside, they were doughy and dense. This is not something I will try again.

  19. Susan says:

    I made both recipes last night for my family. Two of us eat GF, but when I cook just GF the other three members of the family can’t stay out of what I make. Finding two recipes on the same post made it easy to cook for all of us.

    In the GF version
    I used Maple Syrup for my sweetener and used 1/4 cup Butter. I used my homemade corn free baking powder. I think of Arrowroot as a thickener or binder not leavening, so didn’t understand that in the GF recipe. Both batches are being enjoyed today by three generations in my home.

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